Rome in 18 days

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Spending 18 days in Rome and traveling mostly on foot bright this city into a new light. Every time we left the apartment we got closer to the city and discovered new and exciting things. Our first visit was in the mid 80s. We did not return to Italy until 1998. Since then we have made several more trips to Rome if only for a few days. This was the chance for discovery and getting a feel for living somewhat like a local.

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Our Airbnb was close to Campo de Fiore. We walked just about everywhere. The market is picturesque but highly oriented to tourists.  Still many locals go each day, as did we. Fresh produce and fruit came back to our apartment. A small supermarket was also close by to supplement what the market did not have.  There were several salumerie  in the area, and well as several Macellerie for cold cuts and meat.  This became a daily ritual.

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During the next several blogs post, I will be describing the interesting happenings during our stay in Rome.

 

Caio for now.

Off the Beaten Path: Capo di Ponte

Another little town we happened upon unexpectedly,  Having left Lago Iseo and trying to further up toTesimo in  northern Italy we happened upon this small village. CIMG5212.JPG

There was nothing special about it, but upon further investigation we found the  hotel Cumili in the center of town that just opened.  Next we found that  there were prehistoric rock carvings close by.

CIMG5232.JPGCIMG5238.JPGCIMG5244.JPGfullsizeoutput_5229CIMG5252.JPGfullsizeoutput_522c.jpegIt is an easy walk to get around the park. Signs are very informative and the views from high up on the hiltop are amazing. fullsizeoutput_5228.jpegThe styles are Tyrolean as we are approaching the northern area of Italy.  Switzerland is a short ride from here. Capo di Ponte.jpg

Map of Capo di Ponte and the surrounding areafullsizeoutput_522e.jpegAs we left heading north top Tesimo, there was still snow in the hills as we passed a ski area. This photo was taken on July 14th, 2008.

Some more information from Wikipedia

The stone carvings of Val Camonica (Camonica Valley) are located in the Province of BresciaItaly, and constitute the largest collections of prehistoric petroglyphsin the world.[2] The collection was recognized by Unesco in 1979 and was Italy’s first recognized World Heritage Site. Unesco has formally recognized more than 140,000 figures and symbols.